The History of Cannabis Museum

Washington D.C, the capital of the United States of America, is home to one of the most prominent tourist industries in the world. Besides the obvious appeal of the white House, Washington D.C is home to many other attractions that bring tourists from all over the world. D.C is a historic hotspot, and encompasses attractions that can appeal to everyone. Due to the fact that they are free, museums tend to be of the most popular tourist attractions in Washington D.C. Visitors can enjoy the National Air and Space Museum, National Museum of Natural History, National Zoo, National Museum of American History, and the new National Museum of African American History and Culture all for FREE (besides waiting in long lines during peak seasons).

National Mall
A photo of the National Mall during a busy tourist day in the Spring.

Though it is not apart of the Smithsonian, one museum that has not been spoken about much since its conception has been the History of Cannabis museum that was opened on April 17th, 2017. One reason it may not be as popular at the moment is because it doesn’t employ the same policy as the other Smithsonian’s; Unfortunately it costs $10 to get in. However, for those tourists who are looking to also indulge in Cannabis Tourism, this museum would be a great visit.

In 2014, Initiative 71 was passed in Washington D.C. The initiative legalized the recreational use of cannabis in the district, allowing for attractions such as the History of Cannabis Museum to be opened. The museum welcomes the Washington D.C community and all tourists to learn more about the development of cannabis use throughout time and the positive ways that it can impact society.ย 

Now located at 2822 Georgia Ave NW, Washington D.C, 20001, The History of Cannabis Museum is very close to my university. Right across the street from Howard Universities School of Business, the museum will definitely be a great place to visit at some point before my graduation.ย THCb

The History of Cannabis Museum, also known as THC, takes a visitor through the progression of cannabis use throughout the ages, specifically starting at the year 800 BCE in ancient Taiwan. Through their website, THC provides information about how the Hemp plant evolved from Northern China at the beginning of civilization, and is even believed to be the first cultivated fiber plant. According to their website,

“The earliest archeological record of the use of fiber from Cannabis was in China twelve thousand-years ago. Archaeologists unearthed an old Neolithic site at Yuan-Shan, and among the remains dug up included pottery with hemp cord markings on it along with a rod-shaped stone beater, used to pound hemp. Cannabis (Hemp) was also used to make items such as fishing nets, rope, clothes, and paper. The Chinese are thought to have invented hemp paper. Cannabis seeds were used for food, as was cannabis oil, in China.”

According to this timeline, Cannabis would be one of the first and oldest human agricultural crops. For the uses mentioned, it is clear that before cannabis was utilized to get high, it was used in a much more productive lighting by the Chinese. They were aware that hemp is a plant that can be a key resource for humans thousands of years ago, and today it still remains. Unfortunately, cannabis has gotten a negative stigma, however, there is so much more it can be used for that many are not aware of.

THC’s progresses a long way in order to get to the modern day uses of cannabis that we currently abide by. From Emperor Fu Hsi (2900 BCE), The Golden Age of Sail (1000-1400AD), William Shakespeare (1600), all the way to Hollywood Propaganda Films (1936-1950), the museums website is very informative. With such an educational website, I can only imagine the amount of content that the actual museum must have inside. The museum also hosts informative events that involve the community and attempt to educate visitors. Open until 8PM on Friday and Saturday, the THC museum is a great attraction for the weekend crowd! Stay tuned for my visit this upcoming week!

Link: The History of Cannabis Museum